Monday, May 4, 2015

HOW TO BEHAVE HERE, THERE AND EVERYWHERE: Swearing in Public


To the hairstylist telling her client about her date.
Sounds like you had a great time last night and why shouldn't you? You are a (presumably) single young woman enjoying a little fun. How would I know you ask? My son told be all about it.
My 8 year old son who, unfortunately for the poor fellow, had to be dragged along to his mom's appointment. He was quietly sitting in the waiting area being a good boy like he promised his mom, no small feat for a boy who 'needs to dance' while brushing his teeth and and couldn't keep his hands still if he found them glued to one another.
I'm sure the fact that he was in hearing distance of a saucy, swear-word laden story being told by an adult kept his attention better than anything could. You knew he was there. You greeted him upon entrance, asked him if he wanted anything and made his cheeks blush a little bit when you remarked that he was a very handsome boy. So I was a little surprised that you would quickly become oblivious to him (and to everyone else around you) as soon as you turned back to your client and continued the colourful replay of your evening.
His recount of your date and all the sorted 'f-words' you used made for interesting conversation on the way back home which is when he decided to let me in on all that he heard (tucked away in a private room for about 15 minutes, I had missed the whole story).
It was a LONG ride home.
My boy doesn't live in a plastic bubble so I am pretty sure he had heard some of these words before, on the playground or quite possibly at the lips of some other adult who was just as oblivious of him and to the fact that it is pretty darn hard to teach children how we manoeuvre through life with a little courtesy, charm and respect when all they see and hear are inappropriate conversations and foul language from the 'grown-ups who should know better'. It brings to mind a quote from Fred Astaire who once said that "The hardest job kids face today is learning good manners without seeing any."

We all drop the occasional f-bomb (and sometimes worse) in the heat of the moment but when our everyday vocabulary morphs into a scene from an R-rated movie, we bring ourselves down a notch and take our kids down with us.


Find us on FacebookTwitterInstagramPinterest and our new sister site, What She Wore, your daily dose of celebrity style and where to shop!


6 comments:

Marguerite said...

That salon owner needs to know what happened, and how unhappy you are about this unprofessional profanity. I'm sure other customers would prefer not to be forced to listen to this attention seeking hairdresser. Speak up, and change salons if necessary. It's maddening your little son had to hear this, but he will learn most from your good example of public behavior.

Deborah Montgomery said...

I totally agree. Love the quote from Fred Astaire.

Anastasia Schembri said...

Marguerite,
I called the salon owner when I got home and let her know I was not happy, luckily she didn't sound too amused either! We have become so oblivious to others around us and unfortunately it seems no one has a filter around children anymore. :(

Anastasia Schembri said...

Deborah,
isn't it a super quote?! It has stayed with me ever since the day I first heard it!

Sridhar Chandrasekaran said...

You have such an interesting blog. Thanks for sharing. Reading blogs is my hobby and I randomly found your blog. I enjoyed reading your posts. All the best for your future blogging journey. Please keep in touch with me in Twitter, @ipersuade.

Miss Janice said...

I'm glad you called the shop owner. There is no excuse for swearing in public, especially while on the job!

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails